Rev. Dr. Mae Cannon of “Churches for Middle East Peace” interviews two very special guests; Jessica Montell, and Sami Awad. Jessica is an Israeli Jew, and the Executive Director of Hamoked. Sami is a Palestinian Christian and executive director of Holy Land Trust. Sami and Jessica are speaking together in locations across the US as part of the “Pilgrimage to Peace tour.” They sat down to discuss ways the church in America can help promote peace in the Holy Land.

Wes Granberg-Michaelson, author of several books including “Future Faith: Ten Challenges for Reshaping Christianity in the 21st Century” sits down with Kyle Small to discuss his start in public theology, his latest book, and walking the Camino De Santiago together this summer. For 17 years, Wes served as General Secretary of the Reformed Church in America, and has long been active in ecumenical initiatives such as the Global Christian Forum and Christian Churches Together. He is a frequent contributor to Sojourners Magazine.

Rev. Dr. Randy Woodley, Distinguished Professor of Faith and Culture and Director of Intercultural and Indigenous Studies at Portland Seminary, talks with Dr. Travis West about indigenous theology and what he calls, the Harmony Way.

In this episode, WTS professor of practical theology and director of the graduate certificate in disability and ministry, Dr. Ben Conner sits down with Shari Oosting to discuss his new book, “Disabling Mission, Enabling Witness: Exploring Missiology Through the Lens of Disability Studies.

In this episode, Sarah Arthur, who recently published the book A Light so Lovely: The Spiritual Legacy of Madeleine L’Engle, Author of A Wrinkle in Time, sits down with Jeff Munroe to talk about writing this book in light of her own recent cancer diagnosis, and what Madeleine’s life means to her.

In this episode, Dr. Ben Conner sits down with Dr. John Swinton, author and scholar in disability studies and professor at the University of Aberdeen, to discuss his newest book, “Becoming Friends of Time.”

“To give somebody the gift of time and not have the expectations of society, but to value them simply for whom they are—that’s the beginning point for love,” he says.