Posts

Mon., February 10 at 1:30 PM in Mulder Chapel

In such a time of division, politically and ideologically, it becomes difficult for us to live in fellowship with one another. The church is not exempt from this type of division. The Reformed Church in America, like many denominations, faces major questions regarding unity in the face of stark disagreement. Is unity possible? Is our vision of the church as a unified body of Christ idealistic and unattainable?

Rev. Dr. Joseph Small, former director of the PCUSA Office of Theology and Worship, is no stranger to these conversations. In his book Flawed Church, Faithful God: A Reformed Ecclesiology for the Real World, he explores the following questions: What is the Church? Why does it matter for the world we live in? He says, “The church is a communion of intimacy and solidarity because of what it cannot justify about itself coupled with recognition that its justification lies in the grace of God. Only as the church knows that its life is not self-generated and maintained can it witness faithfully to the God who generates and maintains it” (xiv).

Join Rev. Dr. Small for a public lecture, with responses from Rev. Dr. Dan Griswold and Rev. Jennifer Ryden, in which Dr. Small will explore these and other questions related to the communion of the church in this divided age.

This event is sponsored by the Girod Chair of Western Theological Seminary.

Former Grand Rapids Mayor, Rev. George Heartwell is a graduate of Western Theological Seminary (’88), who for 14 years led Heartside Ministries, working with and advocating for the city’s most disadvantaged residents. He also served two terms as City Commissioner from 1992-1999, before being elected mayor in 2003. Rev. Heartwell was Grand Rapids’ longest serving mayor, serving until 2016 and focusing on issues like sustainability, social justice, and community development.

“I believe that politics, narrowly defined, has no place in the pulpit. That said, to not preach a prophetic gospel is to diminish and de-fang if you will the power of the Gospel. The pastor in her or his preaching has to walk that really really difficult line between not being political, but being prophetic.” -Rev. Heartwell

Former Grand Rapids Mayor, Rev. George Heartwell is a graduate of Western Theological Seminary (’88), who for 14 years led Heartside Ministries, working with and advocating for the city’s most disadvantaged residents. He also served two terms as City Commissioner from 1992-1999, before being elected mayor in 2003. Rev. Heartwell was Grand Rapids’ longest serving mayor, serving until 2016 and focusing on issues like sustainability, social justice, and community development.

“I believe that politics, narrowly defined, has no place in the pulpit. That said, to not preach a prophetic gospel is to diminish and de-fang if you will the power of the Gospel. The pastor in her or his preaching has to walk that really really difficult line between not being political, but being prophetic.” -Rev. Heartwell

Who could be a better representation of the power of civility than Nelson Mandela? Today’s guest is WTS alumni and South African theologian, Dr. Tinyiko Maluleke, who is working on a book about Nelson Mandela and hope. Rev. Dr. Denise Kingdom-Grier sat down with him to discuss Mandela’s legacy.

Who could be a better representation of the power of civility than Nelson Mandela? Today’s guest is WTS alumni and South African theologian, Dr. Tinyiko Maluleke, who is working on a book about Nelson Mandela and hope. Rev. Dr. Denise Kingdom-Grier sat down with him to discuss Mandela’s legacy.

In this episode, Professor Tom Boogaart sat down with Kyle Meyaard-Schaap, a WTS graduate and the National Organizer & Spokesperson for Young Evangelicals for Climate Action (YECA), to discuss why young people, and Christians in particular, should care about environmental concerns.

In this episode, Professor Tom Boogaart sat down with Kyle Meyaard-Schaap, a WTS graduate and the National Organizer & Spokesperson for Young Evangelicals for Climate Action (YECA), to discuss why young people, and Christians in particular, should care about environmental concerns.