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TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2019 FROM 4:30-6 P.M. in Mulder Chapel

Join Dr. Jay Dolmage, Professor at the University of Waterloo, for this important talk on creating environments of access and universal design for learning. In this talk, we will collaborate to address the ableist attitudes, policies, and practices that are built into higher education. We will also interrogate the minimal and temporary means we have been given to address inequities, and the cost such an approach has for disabled students and faculty. Finally, we will explore our own ableist biases, apologies and defenses in an effort to build tools for anti-ableist education.

Bio:

Dr. Dolmage is committed to disability rights in his scholarship, service, and teaching. His work brings together rhetoric, writing, disability studies, and critical pedagogy. His first book, entitled Disability Rhetoric, was published with Syracuse University Press in 2014. Academic Ableism: Disability and Higher Education was published with Michigan University Press in 2017 and is available in an open-access version online. Disabled Upon Arrival: Eugenics, Immigration, and the Construction of Race and Disability was published in 2018 with Ohio State University Press. Dr. Dolmage is the Founding Editor of the Canadian Journal of Disability Studies.

The 2019 Summer Institute on Theology and Disability will be held in Holland, Michigan, May 20-23, 2019 in partnership with Western Theological Seminary. The Institute brings together academics, theologians, practitioners, and others to explore the inclusive intersections of faith and disabilities.

The 2019 Summer Institute begins with a Community Day for Institute participants and anyone else who cannot afford the time or expenses for the full Institute. To register for just Community Day, click the “register now” button below and choose the “one day pass- Community Day” option. Its theme is From Longing to Belonging, based on the title of a new book by Jewish parent and inclusion consultant, Shelly Christensen. Shelly and Barbara Newman, from the CLC Network, Inc., will be the Opening Plenary Speakers. A panel will follow with speakers from creative programs and ministries in the region. The afternoon features workshops led by John Swinton, Erik Carter, Barbara Newman, Shelly Christensen, Jill Harshaw, Ben Conner with Sarah Jean Barton and Carlos Thompson, and Alex Kimmel.

For more information on the Summer Institute, please visit https://faithanddisability.org/2019-summer-institute/

 

This fall we welcomed the first Henri Nouwen Doctoral Fellows!

Thanks to funding from a generous grant from the Henry Luce Foundation to further the seminary’s work in the area of disability and ministry, Western was able to invite two young scholars to join the faculty for two years as they finish their dissertations on an aspect of disability studies.

Sarah Barton was born and raised in the Pacific Northwest. She has a B.S. in Biology, an M.S. in Occupational Therapy, and an M.T.S. degree. She is currently a Doctor of Theology Candidate at Duke Divinity School. Sarah brings to our faculty not only strong academic credentials, but also professional experience as an occupational therapist. She speaks on issues related to intellectual disability, disability studies, occupational therapy, global health, and spirituality. She received an Honorary Dissertation Fellowship (2018-2019) from the Louisville Institute and was named the Academic Fellow for the Episcopal Church Foundation’s Fellowship Partners Program (2018-2021).

Sarah is an active Episcopalian who enjoys serving as a lay preacher and lay eucharistic minister.

 

 

Originally from the coastal city of Cartagena, Columbia, L.S. Carlos A. Thompson was adopted by an American family and raised in Fargo, ND. Carlos earned a B.S. in Church Ministry, an M.A. in Religious Studies, and an M.Th. in Ministry and Mission (Practical Theology). He is currently a Ph.D. Candidate in Divinity at the University of Aberdeen, King’s College.

Carlos is a Charismatic-Reformed Pentecostal who lives with congenital cerebral palsy. One of the questions foundational to his research and spiritual reflection is: How are Christians to understand “healing” in the midst of enduring disability and chronic illness?

Carlos is working in the Graduate Certificate in Disability and Ministry program, helping to form the long-term strategy for Western’s ambitious disability and ministry curriculum as part of his PhD research. He lives in and directs the Friendship House, where he gives guidance and sincere friendship to the residents and young adults with cognitive disabilities living there and in the Red Brick apartments. This combination of academic programming and hands-on ministry makes Carlos’ work very valuable to both the seminary and the Holland community.